Blog Archives

Are zoos good or bad for animals?

Source: http://animals.howstuffworks.com/

By: Jennifer Horton

Humans have an insatiable fascination with wild animals. Every year, millions of people go on safaris, board whale-watching cruises and watch Jeff Corwin get attacked by snakes on Animal Planet; others drive to their localzoo for a full day of animal gazing.

This interest in animals is nothing new: Zoos have been entertaining people with exotic animal collections as far back as 1250 B.C.

Later, in early 13th-century England, Henry III moved his family’s royal menagerie to the Tower of Londonfor public viewing. For a small fee, visitors would be treated to glimpses of animals like lions,camels and lynxes. And if they brought a dog or cat to feed the lions, they got in for free

The first modern zoo — the Imperial Menagerie in Vienna, Austria — was established in 1752 and continues to attract visitors to this day. Nearby, in Germany, is the world’s largest animal collection: Zoo Berlin (formerly The Berlin Zoological Gardens) houses more than 15,000 animals from almost 1,700 species

All U.S. animal exhibitors, like the 265-acre (107-hectare) Bronx Zoo just a subway ride away from Fifth Avenue, must apply for and receive a license from the Department of Agriculture. Millions of people visit the thousands of zoos around the world, proving that we simply never grow tired of observing wildlife.

Depending on your point of view, though, zoos are either sanctuaries of education and entertainment or unnecessary prisons. While some people argue that zoos play an important role in conservation and research, others counter that they do more harm than good.

So which is it? Are zoos good or bad? And how do you differentiate between what’s good for one animal versus what’s good for the entire species? It’s a delicate question and one that can’t easily be answered. Let’s start with the good news.

web-bc-zoo-giraffe05

Zoo Pros: Education, Conservation, Entertainment

Zoos have improved significantly in the last 4,000 or so years. Gone are the old steel-bar enclosures and cold cement cages. Most zoos these days use natural-looking barriers like moats or ditches to separate animals from people, and have mini-habitats that resemble the animals’ natural environment.

Adding another point for zoo pros, the procedure for acquiring animals has also changed. Whereas zoos previously captured most of their specimens directly from the wild, they now get many animals throughcaptive breeding programs and other zoos. Some breeding programs also help to restore threatened species. After 10 years of working to strengthen the population numbers of the endangered Californiacondor, a type of vulture, the Los Angeles and San Diego zoos were able to rebuild a population of fewer than two dozen birds to around 170 birds

Successful breeding programs brought the Pere David’s deer back from extinction. Though this Asian deer ceased to exist in the wild, Chinese and European zoo programs enabled four of the deer to be released back into the wild in 1985, where they’re now self-sustaining.

Some zoos also take in abandoned animals that wouldn’t otherwise have a home. Both the Baltimore Zoo and the Detroit Zoo have taken in polar bears rescued from a traveling circus, and the Bronx Zoo took in an orphaned snow leopard from Pakistan in 2007. The cub, Leo, now spends his time frolicking and chasing small animals that wander into his enclosure

And although zoo animals aren’t treated quite like guests at a four-star hotel, their care has improved tremendously. Zookeepers now understand that many animals, such as monkeys, bears and elephants, need engaging activities to prevent boredom and mental deterioration. This is why you’ll often see chimpsplaying with toys or tigers “hunting” for a meal.

Aside from taking care of captive animals, many zoos also contribute to the care of their wild counterparts. The Toledo Zoo, in conjunction with the Nature Conservancy, is helping to restore butterfly habitats in Ohio, and the Bronx Zoo has channeled more than $3 million toward conservation projects in central Africa

Zoos also present an opportunity for scientists to conduct research. In 2002, zoos participated in 2,230 research and conservation projects in more than 80 countries. The information they gather helps them to develop new medicines and techniques to improve animal health.

Beyond the positive impact zoos try to have on animals, they often affect the people visiting as well. Zoos don’t just entertain, they also aim to educate. With a variety of programs geared toward children and adults, zoos teach people about the needs of animals and the importance of conservation. And if people get excited enough, the thinking goes that they’ll be more inclined to donate money to conservation efforts — another zoo pro.

The fact that zoos impact people in a positive way is nice, but it’s not the people critics worry about — it’s the animals.

c-jihlava-zoo-1

Read the rest of this entry

White Tiger Kills Student At Delhi Zoo in India (Video)

info-pictogram1 Yesterday afternoon 13:30 (local time), a horrible accident took place at the Delhi Zoo. A 22-year-old student fell right over the fence into the cage of a white tiger. Cameras could capture how the man’s strong jaws of the animal did not survive.

Gaza zoo ravaged by Israeli shelling

666x405

Source: http://www.aljazeera.com/

Beit Lahiya, Gaza Strip – Throughout Israel’s military assault on Gaza, Wasef Hamad risked his life on a regular basis. But unlike most Palestinians living under Israeli bombardment, Hamad did not venture out in the midst of Israeli air strikes to bring food to his displaced family, take refuge at a local school, or to check on his destroyed home.

Instead, Hamad put himself in danger to protect lions, monkeys, ostriches, and other animals, all of which were slowly starving at the Bissan Zoo, in the northern Gaza town of Beit Lahiya.

Read the rest of this entry

Subhana’llah: White Gorilla (IMAGES)

10405432_1081849101844780_7152104830240346639_n

info-pictogram1 Snowflake (c. 1964 – November 24, 2003) was an albino gorilla. He was the only known albino gorilla so far, and the most popular resident of the Barcelona Zoo in Catalonia, Spain. He weighs 400 lbs. In 2011, Snowflake was featured on the Guinness World Records 2012 as a new record entry named “Rarest Gorilla”. The book also mentions that unlike other animals that suffer from albinism, Snowflake has blue eyes suggesting that he was a chinchilla albino, caused by the recessive gene mutant gene also found on white tigers.

What zoos should look like (IMAGE)

BduI6YNIYAAozrE

MOTHER LION AND HER BABY (IMAGE)

BamrbeyIMAA47Dy

Lions once lived across Europe, Africa and North America, but they are now found primarily in Africa. They range from the southern border of the Sahara to the northern parts of South Africa. They dwell in the savanna habitat.

  • A lion’s roar can be heard up to 5 miles (8 kilometers) away, according to the National Zoo.
  • Most lions drink water daily if available, but can go four or five days without it. Lions in arid areas seem to obtain needed moisture from the stomach contents of their prey.
  • When males take over a pride, they usually kill the cubs. The females come into estrus and the new males sire other cubs.