Blog Archives

Subhana’llah: Camels (IMAGES)

az_camel

info-pictogram1 Camels can drink up to 40 gallons of water in one go.Their temperature ranges from 34 degrees Celsius at night to 41 degrees during the day. They don’t begin to sweat until they are over 41 degrees. One reason camels can go long periods without water is the shape of their red blood cells. These are oval and so will flow when they are dehydrated rather than clumping, as ours do. The camel is the only mammal to have oval red blood cells. They can close their nostrils against wind and sand when necessary.

Advertisements

Miracle of God: Water

0f458fce470938f1695a8f9865485f17_large

Source: everystudent.com

By: Marilyn Adamson

Water…colorless, odorless and without taste, and yet no living thing can survive without it. Plants, animals and human beings consist mostly of water (about two-thirds of the human body is water). You’ll see why the characteristics of water are uniquely suited to life:

It has an unusually high boiling point and freezing point. Water allows us to live in an environment of fluctuating temperature changes, while keeping our bodies a steady 98.6 degrees.

Read the rest of this entry

What Causes Winds

wind

Reported by Abu Hurairah (RA): I heard the Messenger of Allah saying: “The wind is a blessing of Allah. Sometimes it brings His mercy and sometimes it brings His chastisement. When you experience it, do not revile it but beg of Allah its good, and seek Allah’s refuge against its evil.

[Abu Dawud – Riyad us Saliheen Chapter 323, 1728]

info-pictogram1 Wind is caused by differences in atmospheric pressure created, in large part, by the unequal heating of the earth’s surface by the sun. Air moves from a region of higher pressure to one of lower pressure and this movement is wind. Any difference in pressure will cause wind, but the greater the difference the stronger the wind.

The direction that wind takes is influenced by the rotation of the earth. On a nonrotating earth wind would move in a straight path from a high- to a low-pressure area. It is deflected from this path—to the right in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern—by the turning of the earth on its axis.

Local winds—those that affect a comparatively small area—are often caused by heat transferred by convection. Direct radiation from the sun does little to heat the air. It is warmed chiefly by heat radiated from the earth. Intense local heating of the land causes air directly above to become greatly heated and to expand. As a result, some of the air aloft flows away, lowering the pressure over the heated area and increasing the pressure around it. The cooler, heavier air near the earth then flows to the heated area.

In mountainous areas, winds tend to blow uphill during the day because the mountainside is heated more than the valley below it. At night, when the mountainside cools, the wind blows downhill. In summer, breezes tend to blow from oceans or large lakes to the warmer land during the day. They blow from the land at night, when the land cools.

As Ramadan starts to wind down, Here are some things that we can continue to do throughout the year

284097_239952959358086_8342666_n

By: Omar Suleiman

The most obvious deed to continue is fasting because despite how long the days have been, fasting has become your second nature by now. So it’s no coincidence that we were encouraged by the Prophet (salAllahu alayhi wa salam) to follow up a month of fasting in Ramadan with 6 days of fasting in Shawwal.

Now is the time to start fasting Mondays and Thursdays and the 13th, 14th, and 15th of every Islamic month. Your body is used to it and your soul craves it. But here’s something else I would add. Although we really can’t have Ramadan outside of Ramadan, which is why the fasts will feel different, we can try to duplicate the experience as much as possible. What makes Ramadan special ASIDE from fasting is the Taraweeh prayer, Quran recitation, community/family iftars, etc. Obviously the month of Ramadan also has virtues that are completely out of our control like Laylatul Qadr, the gates of paradise opened, the gates of hell shut, etc. But for the first set of things, we should try to create a similar experience. So here are my tips:

Read the rest of this entry

Japan Typhoon Neoguri video: Worst storm in 15 years making landfall (Video)

Source: http://rt.com/news/171172-japan-typhoon-okinawa-evacuate/

info-pictogram1 A super typhoon with destructive winds, towering waves and storm surges is heading to the Japanese island of Okinawa.

5

Watch more video material:

Extreme Tornado: Never-before-seen storm chasing footage (Video)

info-pictogram1 TVN storm chaser Mike Scantlin chases down tornadoes (solo) on November 7, 2011 in Oklahoma with his beat-up Subaru! Over ten minutes of raw tornado footage that has never been seen.

Small fennec fox braving the wind (IMAGE)

BhCV6DoIgAAysYB

 

info-pictogram1 The fennec fox or fennec (Vulpes zerda) is a small nocturnal fox found in the Sahara of North Africa. Its most distinctive feature is its unusually large ears, which serve to dissipate heat. Its name comes from the Arabic word فنك (fanak), which means fox, and the species name zerda comes from the Greek word xeros which means dry, referring to the fox’s habitat. The fennec is the smallest species of canid in the world. Its coat, ears, and kidney functions have adapted to high-temperature, low-water, desert environments. In addition, its hearing is sensitive enough to hear prey moving underground. It mainly eats insects, small mammals, and birds.

The fennec has a life span of up to 14 years in captivity. Its main predators are the African varieties of eagle owl. Families of fennecs dig out dens in sand for habitation and protection, which can be as large as 120 m2 (1,292 sq ft) and adjoin the dens of other families. Precise population figures are not known but are estimated from the frequency of sightings; these indicate that the animal is currently not threatened by extinction. Knowledge of social interactions is limited to information gathered from captive animals. The species is usually assigned to the genus Vulpes; however, this is debated due to differences between the fennec fox and other fox species. The fennec’s fur is prized by the indigenous peoples of North Africa, and in some parts of the world, the animal is considered an exotic pet.