Blog Archives

Start, or End, Your Day with this Small Thought

swebb

By: Suhaib Webb

The Prophet (sa) said, ‘The hour will start when Allah’s name is no longer mentioned.” Sahih Muslim

Creation rests on God’s remembrance. Start, or end, your day with it, and use this hadith to bring the greatness of the moment, the moment his blessed name pours from you soul, and thank him for guiding you!

“Remember me and I will remember you.”

Wishing you all a great presence wherever you are,
Suhaib
@EllaCollinsInstitute

2 Minutes 4 Faith: A new way to look at Eid (Video)

By: Suhaib Webb

info-pictogram1 A new way to look at ‘Eid, Community Dua and a special prayer for Palestine: #2Minutes4Faith @EllaCollinsInstitute

Eid Blessings!

Eid Mubarak

By: Suhaib Webb

Source: http://ellacollinsinstitute.org/

The word ‘Eīd comes from a word that means to return. The ‘Arab’s coined the term for holidays because they occurred “returned” every year. While that is important, the idea of returning challenges us to ponder a few thing

 Returning to God 

The Prophet (sa) said, “Believers are like horses; they escape from their master only to return one day.” For many, this Ramadān was difficult. I heard from a number of folks that this was the “toughest” Ramadān ever. Others complained “I did not feel I did well this year. The long days were difficult to manage.” As we come out of Ramadān, we cannot be defeated by a sense of guilt. Instead, let us return to Allah by repenting to him, refresh our hearts and renew our commitment to faith.

Allāh says,

وَمَن يَعْمَلْ سُوۤءاً أَوْ يَظْلِمْ نَفْسَهُ ثُمَّ يَسْتَغْفِرِ ٱللَّهَ يَجِدِ ٱللَّهَ غَفُوراً رَّحِيماً

“Who wrongs others, or his own soul, then seeks God’s pardon, he will find God forgiving merciful.” Qur’ān 4:110

Meaning: Who commits any sin or crime, then repents sincerely to God, replacing evil with good, or by righting a wrong committed, he will discover that his lord will cover his faults and guide him from his mistakes.

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Suhaib Webb: Come out of Ramadan with a clean slate (Video)

info-pictogram1 With only a few days left, do this to come out of Ramadān with a clean slate! @EllaCollinsInstitute#2minutes4faith

Suhaib Webb – Ramadan 2014 Message To The People, 2 Minutes 4 Faith (Video)

info-pictogram1 If the days of Ramadan remind us of death, the nights of Ramadan remind is of something else! @EllaCollinsInstitute #2minutes4faith

The ocean of the World

beach-waves

By: Yasmin Mogahed

Sourcehttp://www.suhaibwebb.com/

Yesterday, I went to the beach. As I sat watching the massive Californian waves, I realized something strange. The ocean is so breathtakingly beautiful. But just as it is beautiful, it is also deadly. The same spellbinding waves, which we appreciate from the shore, can kill us if we enter them. Water, the same substance necessary to sustain life, can end life, in drowning. And the same ocean that holds ships afloat can shatter those ships to pieces.

This worldly life, the dunya, is just like the ocean. And our hearts are the ships. We can use the ocean for our needs and as a means to get to our final destination. But the ocean is only that: a means. It is a means for seeking food of the sea. It is a means of travel. It is a means of seeking a higher purpose. But it is something which we only pass through, but never think to remain in. Imagine what would happen if the ocean became our end – rather than just a means.

Eventually we would drown.

As long as the ocean’s water remains outside the ship, the ship will continue to float and be in control. But what happens as soon as the water creeps into the ship? What happens when the dunya is not just water outside of our hearts, when the dunya is no longer just a means? What happens when the dunya enters our heart?

That is when the boat sinks.

That is when the heart is taken hostage and becomes a slave. And that is when the dunya – which was once under our control – begins to control us. When the ocean’s water enters and overtakes a ship, that ship is no longer in control. The boat then becomes at the mercy of the ocean.

To stay afloat, we must view this world in exactly the same way, for Allah (Subhaanahu Wa Ta’ala) has told us that “Verily in the creation of the heavens and the earth are signs for those who reflect.” (Qur’an,3:190) We live in the dunya, and the dunya is in fact created for our use. Detachment from dunya (zuhd) does not mean that we do not interact with this world. Rather, the Prophet ﷺ has taught us that we must:

Anas (Radiallahu Anhu) said: “Three people came to the houses of the wives of the Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, to ask about how the Prophet ﷺ worshipped. When they were told, it was as if they thought it was little and said, ‘Where are we in relation to the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, who has been forgiven his past and future wrong actions?’” He said, “One of them said, ‘I will pray all of every night.’ Another said, ‘I will fast all the time and not break the fast.’ The other said, “I will withdraw from women and never marry.’ The Messenger of Allah came to them and said, ‘Are you the ones who said such-and-such? By Allah, I am the one among you with the most fear and awareness of Allah, but I fast and break the fast, I pray and I sleep, and I marry women. Whoever disdains my sunnah is not with me.’” [Sahih Bukhari]

The Prophet ﷺ did not withdraw from the dunya in order to be detached from it. His detachment was much deeper. It was the detachment of the heart. His ultimate attachment was only to Allah (Subhaanahu Wa Ta’ala) and the home with Him, for he truly understood the words of God:

“What is the life of this world but amusement and play? But verily the Home in the Hereafter, – that is life indeed, if they but knew.” (Qur’an, 29:64)

Detachment does not even mean that we cannot own things of the dunya. In fact many of the greatest companions were wealthy. Rather, detachment is that we view and interact with the dunya for what it really is: just a means. Detachment is when the dunya remains in our hand – not in our heart. As `Ali (Radiallahu Anhu) expressed beautifully, “Detachment is not that you should own nothing, but that nothing should own you.”

Like the ocean’s water entering the boat, the moment that we let the dunya enter our hearts, we will sink. The ocean was never intended to enter the boat; it was intended only as a means that must remain outside of it. The dunya, too, was never intended to enter our heart. It is only a means that must not enter or control us. This is why Allah (Subhaanahu Wa Ta’ala) repeatedly refers to the dunya in the Qur’an as a mata’a. The word mata’a can be translated as a “resource for transitory worldly delight.” It is a resource. It is a tool. It is the path—not the destination.

And it is this very concept that the Prophet ﷺ spoke about so eloquently when he said:

“What relationship do I have with this world? I am in this world like a rider who halts in the shade of a tree for a short time, and after taking some rest, resumes his journey leaving the tree behind.” (Ahmad, Tirmidhi)

Consider for a moment the metaphor of a traveler. What happens when you’re traveling or you know that your stay is only temporary? When you’re passing through a city for one night, how attached do you get to that place? If you know it’s temporary, you’ll be willing to stay at Motel 6. But would you like to live there? Probably not. Suppose your boss sent you to a new town to work on a limited project. Suppose he didn’t tell you exactly when the project would end, but you knew that you could be returning home, any day. How would you be in that town? Would you invest in massive amounts of property and spend all your savings on expensive furniture and cars? Most likely not. Even while shopping, would you buy cart-loads of food and other perishables? No. You’d probably hesitate about buying any more than you need for a couple days – because your boss could call you back any day.

This is the mindset of a traveler. There is a natural detachment that comes with the realization that something is only temporary. That is what the Prophet ﷺ in his wisdom, is talking about in this profound hadith. He understood the danger of becoming engrossed in this life. In fact, there was nothing he feared for us more.

He ﷺ said, “By Allah I don’t fear for you poverty, but I fear that the world would be abundant for you as it has been for those before you, so you compete for it as they have competed for it, so it destroys you as it has destroyed them.” (Agreed upon)

The blessed Prophet ﷺ recognized the true nature of this life. He understood what it meant to be in the dunya, without being of it. He sailed the very same ocean that we all must. But his ship knew well from where it had come, and to where it was going. His was a boat that remained dry. He understood that the same ocean which sparkles in the sunlight, will become a graveyard for the ships that enter it.

Read part two here.

http://muslimvillage.com/2014/05/06/53069/the-ocean-of-the-world/

The Deen Show: How a Muslim would invite Justin Bieber to Islam? (Video)

info-pictogram1 Eddie had a chance to sit with Imam Suhaib Webb and asked him if given the chance to sit and talk with Justin Bieber how would he invite him to the Purpose of life?  Please help share this video and help it go viral so God willing the message can get to Justin Bieber!!!
More episodes…

8 Things You Should Understand About Converts

1. A lot of things are running through our heads right now.

“And We will surely test you with something of fear and hunger and a loss of wealth and lives and fruits, but give good tidings to the patient”  (Qur’an, 2:155).

New converts to Islam have just made the biggest decision of their lives, and changed their religion to one that they are unfamiliar with in many ways. There are a lot of stimuli around us that we are not used to, being in the mosque, hanging out with Muslims, hearing foreign languages other than Spanish, etc. Often, new Muslims might look uncomfortable because they are not used to their surroundings. A big change has just occurred in the convert’s life, and each person will respond differently to these situations.

While we are learning the basics of Islam, either before or after our shahada (testimony of faith), we are constantly coming across new things that we’ve never heard of before. It takes a long time to be able to have a consistent foundation that’s strong enough to feel any amount of comfort in the religion. This process is similar to moving to a foreign country, not knowing the language, customs, or environment that surrounds us. We often have no idea about the origin of certain customs and whether they are from Islam or a person’s culture, and it takes time to be able to discern between the two.

2. Our family life is uncertain.

A man asked the Prophet ﷺ (peace be upon him): ‘What is the right of parents on their offspring?’ The Prophet  replied: “They are your Paradise and your Hell.” (Sunan Ibn Majah)

People who are born into Islam have the benefit of having a foundation with their parents and family. The Qur’an is on their bookshelf, Arabic words are mixed into conversation without needing definition, and there is an environment of tradition that provides a reference point for looking at the world. A convert is experiencing the total opposite. He or she doesn’t have any sort of religious connection with their family anymore, and there is sometimes backlash from parents and extended family about the decision to become a Muslim.

Even if there’s no significant backlash, there are no blood relatives to talk to about Islam, no one to clarify things, and no family support to be offered in the entire process. All of these things can cause an immense amount of stress and disillusionment. It’s common for converts to have moments of breakdown where they feel like nobody is on their side. For those who are lucky enough to have a close friend or mentor to help them in situations like this, it’s still not the same as having family help. Converts need an exceptionally good amount of emotional support from individuals in their community to feel empowered as Muslims. This doesn’t require a full-time therapist, but just people to make them feel at home.

3. Our friends are leaving us.

“A man follows the religion of his close friend, so each of you should be very careful about whom he takes as a close friend.” —The Prophet Muhammad ﷺ (Abu Dawud, Tirmidhi)

Friends are known for being brutally honest. When a convert tells his friends that he or she just became Muslim, they are going to receive a wide range of reactions. Even if their friends are supportive, they will still be really puzzled and they will ask a million questions that most born Muslims would have trouble answering. And while most converts don’t get a Ph.D. in Islamic Studies before becoming Muslim, they’re going to sometimes feel pushed into a corner when tested by their friends.

Their friends might stick around for a while, but chances are their habits are not always what a new Muslim wants to be around. After you deny a few invitations to go to parties, they might stop calling all together. Friends who seem to have abandoned you can cause a lot of depression and loneliness, and it will always take a while to replace a decent group of friends with a good group of Muslim friends.

4. We don’t know how to spend our free time.

“Whenever a Muslim is afflicted with a hardship, sickness, sadness, worry, harm, or depression –even a thorn’s prick, Allah expiates his sins because of it.”  —The Prophet Muhammad ﷺ (Bukhari, Muslim)

After the distance is created with friends and family, it’s hard to fill free time or stay busy enough to not start feeling down sometimes. Converts will notice a gap in their schedules that was previously filled with something else like hanging out with friends, going to concerts, or partying. This is especially hard to cope with in a smaller city where there isn’t much else to do and not enough Muslims to spend time with.

In this situation, there might be a desire to go back to old habits to feel “normal” again, or there will be an urge to stay alone and away from other people. While Islam doesn’t allow monasticism or hedonism, this causes a problem for converts to Islam when it’s a minority religion in the society. Eventually the situation will get easier and there won’t be any problem in staying busy, but initially it can be very hard to stay positive.

5. We don’t know what to learn and who to learn from.

“Make things easier, do not make things more difficult, spread the glad tidings, do not hate.” —The Prophet Muhammad ﷺ (Bukhari)

Converts usually experience some trouble in the beginning with differences in fiqh (jurisprudence). Their background is usually from a religion with a narrower view of right or wrong. Often converts will think: “So do I raise my hands after bowing or not? Which one is right and which one is wrong?” The fact is there are many correct opinions regarding such issues in Islam. Converts will often find themselves in the dilemma of whether to take the easier opinion or the stronger one.

At the very best, this will cause only a small amount of confusion at first. Remember that converts don’t have a family to help form their opinions about these things, and they are getting information from all sides. A common decision converts will make is choosing between zabiha (ritually slaughtered) and non-zabiha meat. In reality it’s a fact that there is a difference of opinion among scholars regarding the meat of Ahl-al-Kitab (People of the Book, i.e. Jews and Christians), but converts can feel pressured to take one opinion over the other based on someone’s limited knowledge of the issue.

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SUHAIB WEBB: Spirituality & Society (Video)

info-pictogram1 In the Qur’an, Allah Almighty swears that whoever purifies his soul is successful and those who corrupt it are losers (Ash-Shams 91:9-10). These verses are often misunderstood. Spirituality, in fact, is not about spending isolated times with God in order to experience  transcendence. This is, indeed, a lowermaqam (level) in the life of a committed believer. No doubt these moments with Allah are important. Allah Almighty told His Prophet:

{Stand (to prayer) by night, but not all night,-

Half of it,- or a little less,} (Al-Muzzamil 73:2 -3)

But true spirituality is to be able to move from those moments of solitude with Allah to begin to find spiritual  peace and tranquility within the creation and when dealing with others. Allah Almighty says about the prophets that they used to walk in the markets; that they used to deal with people.

Often we fail to understand this; we think that spirituality is to work on the heart only. Sheikh Osama Sayed Al-Azhari, My Sheikh in Hadith, said something beautiful about Surat Ash-Shams. He said that the word Nafs [translated as soul] in its origin means the entire life of a person. It is not restricted to the internal, spiritual development. [The plural form of the word nafs] is mentioned in the verse {And do not kill yourselves (anfusakum)…} (Al-Baqarah 4:29) That does not mean killing the internal reality of people but the entire body; the entire existence.

So Sheik Osama said that [the purification of the] soul here (Ash-Shams 91:9) is made up of the following:

1. The internal purification of the heart.

2. Having good akhlaq, that is, good external character with Allah and with His creation. When the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) was asked about what takes people to Jannah, he said, “Being mindful of Allah (taqwa) and having good character” (At-Tirmidhi and ranked Hasan by Al-Albani)

Allah brings both aspects together when he says:

{Indeed, Allah loves those who are constantly repentant and loves those who purify themselves.} (Al-Baqarah 2:222)
More lectures…

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