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Brief history of Prophet Musa (a.s) and Firaun

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Source: We Are Muslim

It is obligatory upon every believer to have firm conviction on what Allah has mentioned in the Qur’an. They must have belief that whatever is mentioned in the Qur’an is the truth and there is not a doubt on even one letter of the Qur’an. To have the slightest amount of doubt regarding the Qur’an will render a person out of the fold of Islam (may Allah preserve our faith, Ameen). It is incorrect to compare the Qur’an to historical and archeological research and judge Qur’an through their scope and understanding. Firstly, historical data has always been tampered with and has been influenced many a times by people’s emotions and understanding of history. Secondly, historians and archeologist reject anything for which they have not found any proof. Not being able to find any ‘proofs’ does not negate the whole incident and render the incident false. It merely means they weren’t able to discover any archeological proofs. Thirdly, the Word of Allah is superior than any science or history. Therefore, if even some historical information or scientific and archeological fact appears contradictory to the teachings of the Qur’an, then we will hold fast to the Qur’an and leave aside all others.

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Jihad: A Misunderstood Concept from Islam – Rebellion Against Rulers

By: Shaykh Muhammad Hisham Kabbani (Chairman, Islamic Supreme Council of America), Shaykh Seraj Hendricks

Source: islamicsupremecouncil.org

Rebellion Against Rulers

The scholar Ibn Nujaym said “it is not permitted for there to be more than one state leader (Imam) in a time period. There may be many judges, even in one state, but the leader is one.” Al-Bahjouri said “It is an obligation to obey the leader, even if he is not fair or trustworthy or even if he committed sins or mistakes.” Abu Hanifa’s school says that the head of the state, the Imam, cannot be expelled for being a corrupt person (fasiq). Hudhaifa bin al-Yaman narrated a hadith in which he said, “The Prophet (saws) said, ‘there will be after me leaders who do not follow my guidance and do not follow my sunna, and there will be among them men whose hearts are like those of satan in the body of a human being.’ And I asked the Prophet (saws), ‘What I should do at that time if I reach it?’ He said, ‘listen and obey the ruler, even if he lashed your back and took your money, listen and obey.’”

In another narration, Auf bin Malik t said, “O Prophet of Allah, do you recommend that we fight them?” He said, “No, don’t fight them as long as they do not prevent you from your prayers. And if you see from them something that you dislike, dislike their acts, do not dislike them. And do not take your hand out from obedience to them.” Bukhari and Muslim narrated from Abdullah ibn al-Abbas, “if someone dislikes his ruler, he must be patient, because if he comes against the ruler in a rebellious or destructive manner by only a handspan and dies, he dies in a state of pre-Islamic ignorance (jahiliyyah) and sin.”

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Disunity in al-Andalus: The Taifa Period

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Source: http://lostislamichistory.com/

One of the recurring themes of Islamic history is that disunity in the Muslim world has consistently led to weakness and the decline of one-powerful empires. One of the most clear examples of this was the taifa period of al-Andalus – Muslim Spain – in the 11th century. In the 700s, al-Andalus was established as a powerful and prosperous province under the Umayyads. After the Abbasid revolution of 750, al-Andalus became an autonomous state under the sovereignty of what remained of the Umayyad dynasty.

Al-Andalus reached its peak around the year 1000. The Umayyad Caliphate of Cordoba was the most powerful state in Western Europe politically as well as economically. The artistic, academic, and social achievements of al-Andalus rivaled that of any other part of the Muslim world at that time, including the advanced civilizations in Iraq, Egypt, and Persia. However, within 50 years, all that would change. Al-Andalus would go from being one powerful united state, to one that is divided, vulnerable to invasion, and politically dependent on outsiders. This time, known as the Taifa Period, sowed the seeds for the decline of al-Andalus and its eventual fall in 1492.

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