Blog Archives

Biography of Malik ibn Anas (RA)

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Source: teachislam.com

A scholar of Hadeeth and Fiqh and the renowned Imam of the Madinah.

Abu Abdullah, Malik ibn Anas ibn Malik ibn Amer al-Asbahee was born in
Madinah in the year 93 AH (714 CE). His ancestral home was in Yemen, but his
grandfather settled in Madinah after embracing Islam.

Malik became the Imam of the Madinah, and one of the most renowned Imams of
Islam.

He received his education in what was the most important seat of Islamic learning,
Madinah, and where lived the immediate descendants and the followers of the
companions of the Prophet, sallallahu alayhi wasallam, were living.

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The Surprising Origin of Birthdays

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Source: triumphpro.com

By: William F. Dankenbring (Christian)

Almost everybody, today, celebrates birthdays. Around the world, friends and relatives hold birthday parties, give gifts to the one being honored, and wish “Happy birthday!” to the one whosebirthday is being celebrated.

But why?

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Katy Perry to Perform Illuminati Half Time Ritual at Super Bowl XLIX (Video)

info-pictogram1 Katy Perry Chosen to Perform Illuminati Half Time Ritual at Super Bowl XLIX in February 2015.

Hajj for Kids – 10 Activities to Learn about Hajj

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By: Hafsa Taher

Source: http://productivemuslim.com

It’s that time of the year. Muslims across the globe are preparing to leave for Hajj. Some of us will not be performing the rituals of Hajj in Makkah this year. However, it is still important to utilise the valuable 10 days of Dhul Hijjah productively and inspire our kids to understand its significance as well.

So how do we keep the spirit of Hajj alive for our children during these precious days and make it a productive learning period for them? Here are 10 Hajj crafts for your children. Feel free to improvise (each child is unique!) and don’t forget to leave a comment to let me know which ones you tried/liked/enjoyed!

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Ritual Prayer: Its Meaning and Manner

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By: Shaykh Muhammad Hisham Kabbani

Source: http://islamicsupremecouncil.org/

Prayer is one of the central elements of Islamic practice and worship. Indeed, it is the second of the Five Pillars of Islam and, along with the testimony of faith, the pilgrimage to Mecca, fasting the month of Ramadan and paying the poor tax, forms the essential framework of religious life for Muslims. More than that, the observance of the ritual prayer forms the framework of each Muslim’s day, from the pre-dawn morning prayer to the night prayer that precedes sleep. Read the rest of this entry

How Faith Influences Health

Source: http://www.suhaibwebb.com/personaldvlpt/worship/fasting-ramadan/how-faith-influences-health/

By: Khalil Marcus Lambert, Ph.D.

In his famous book, How to Eat to Live, the leader of the Nation of Islam (a conduit through which many African-Americans were introduced to Islam) emphatically states: “There is no way for us to learn the right way to eat in order to live a long life, except through the guidance and teachings of Allah.”

Although Elijah Muhammad’s Islamic creed diverted from traditional mainstream Islam, he understood well that the key to addressing the complete spiritual and mental vitality of his people was by placing an emphasis on their physical well-being, which he addressed through ancestral eating habits and social vices; undoubtedly a wholesome approach borrowed from the Qur’an and example of the Prophet Muhammad ﷺ (peace be upon him).

The Prophet Muhammad SAW placed great emphasis on physical matters in developing spiritual matters. In a famous hadith (saying of the Prophet)1 , the Messenger of Allah SAW observes a man praying the ritual salah (prayer) and says to the man, “Go back, for you have not prayed.” After the man’s return, the Prophet ﷺ says to him repeatedly, “Go back, for you have not prayed.” Because the man was not implementing the true mechanics of the prayer to the best of his ability, he was likely depriving himself of its complete spiritual and emotional benefit.

Arguably every religious ritual or habit put into practice by the Prophet SAW holds a deep spiritual benefit that is only uncovered through regular or meticulous application.  However, many traditions have obvious physical and emotional benefits as well.  Within the Islamic tradition are directives that uplift the whole life of the individual.  Fasting is the perfect example.

Routine, periodic fasting has been shown to have a number of positive effects:

  1. detoxification;
  2. contracted stomach (and satisfaction with less food);
  3. lower blood sugar and cholesterol;
  4. and even evidence for combating cancer.2

During a fast, energy is diverted away from the digestive system to concentrate on metabolic and immune functions.  Master regulator hormones called glucocorticoids are released to aid the body in breaking down fat cells and forming glucose molecules for energy. Side effects of this can be the release of toxins trapped in fat cells and maintenance of normal blood pressure.3

Elijah Muhammad notes, “Fasting is a greater cure of our ills, both mental and physical, than all of the drugs of the earth combined into one bottle or a billion bottles.” These were wise words to many African American families predisposed to poor health conditions.

What many Muslims have not truly appreciated are the Islamic and faith-based practices that influence our body’s health.  Many researchers have studied the effects of Ramadan, prayer, and other religious influences on individual health, yet population-based studies have been confounded by profound cultural and ethnic diversity.  Thus, it is difficult to draw conclusions about health associations from a population with so many contributing variables.  Still, intriguing questions remain about the overall health benefits of Islamic mandates.

For example, what are the health implications of the prohibition of alcohol, pork, sex before marriage, etc. on the Muslim community? How has the non-reductionist, holistic perspective on healing affected the health of Muslim populations? Can common characteristics be observed in the (epi)genetic profiles of Muslims?4

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