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Hadith on forgiveness and justice

had-stud

Source: lastprophet.info

By: Shaykh Abdal Hakim Mura

Forgiveness and Justice: Meditations on Some Hadiths by Abdal Hakim Murad

(1) The Prophet prayed for pardon for his people, and received the reply: ‘I have forgiven them all but acts of oppression, for I shall exact recompense for the one who is wronged, from his oppressor.’

In the Quran, God is just, and requires justice; but he is also forgiving, and requires forgiveness; in fact, its references to the latter property outnumber those on justice by a ratio of approximately ten to one. Islamic theology has not always been clear how the ensuing tension is to be resolved. ‘My Mercy outstrips My wrath’ is a well-known divine saying (hadith qudsi) but one which nonetheless is far from abolishing God’s wrath. Indeed, a righteous indignation about injustice is integral to the prophetic representation of God’s qualities, and from the earliest moments of its revelation the Qur’an links God’s expectations of His creatures to justice towards the weak. Often the same texts are explicitly eschatological, affirming that those who do not uphold God’s justice in this world will be at its receiving end in the next. Indigenous Arab religion can expect a stern retribution, given that its demands are for tribal solidarity, not for the upholding of universal canons of justice. The idol cannot demand justice, only retribution (tha’r); and the prophetic vocation must therefore link the destruction of paganism with the establishment of a code of justice which overturns Arab norms by refusing to discriminate between the tribes. This hadith is to be read against the background of clan vendettas: instead of seeking collective retaliation against a miscreant’s tribe, the victim of injustice is to appeal to the new law, and to recall that all apparentimbalances will have a just settlement at the judgement seat.

(2) There is an act of charity [sadaqa] to be given for each part of the human body; and for every day over which the sun rises there is a reward of a sadaqa for the one who establishes justice among people. 

Justice (‘adl) is due balance (i‘tidal): it is impartiality. The same word is employed to describe the balance of the body’s four humours. When these are in balance, right thinking and health are the consequence. When they are not, the Qur’an speaks of the last day when ‘their tongues, their hands and their feet will bear witness to what they used to do.’ (Quran 24:24)

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Imam Siraj Wahhaj: Mark of a Hero – Malcolm X (Video)

info-pictogram1 Main Session 4, Mark of a Hero: They were the epitome of bravery and their lives are soaked with heroic qualities that the entire world marvels at hundreds of years later. This session will unravel the characteristics & persona of the greatest heroes of the past and practical steps towards inculcating similar qualities in our own lives. Sh. Waleed Basyouni will speak on the respected early scholar of Islam, Hassan al-Basri.
More Imam Siraj Wahhaj lectures…

Qualities of the Khawārij Sect Found Amongst Some Muslims Today

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By: Suhaib Webb

The Khawārij were a group who tried to exceed the piety established by the Prophet (sa). In fact, that caused them to question his positions and even kill some of his companions (ra). In an excellent book titled Studies on Religious Cults and Muslim History (Dirasāt al-Furuq wa Tārīkh al-Muslimīn) the writer gathers a number of qualities of the Khawārij, who in the name of piety, do more damage than good. Here are a few. Inshallah, I plan to translate them all in the future.

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Mufti Menk: Getting to know the Companions (Day 17) – Abdullah Ibn Salam, Huzaifah Ibn Al Yaman

info-pictogram1 The Series “Getting to Know the Companions of Muhammad pbuh” will take place at Masjid Tuanku Mizan also known as the Steel Mosque in Putra Jaya, Malaysia daily after the taraweeh prayers.

DOWNLOADBUTTONpasstheknowledge-ptkbannerheadapp(Duration: 31:52 — 14.6MB)

3 Qualities from Patience (IMAGE)

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3 Qualities are from Patience:

1) Not speaking about your misfortune
2) Not speaking about your pain
3) And not praising yourself

By: Imam Sufyaan Ath-Thawree (may Allah have mercy on him)

DON’T TAKE ANY OF THESE PEOPLE AS YOUR ROLE MODELS

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(WARNING: DON’T TAKE ANY OF THESE PEOPLE IN THE PICTURE AS YOUR ROLE MODELS) Unfortunately it’s sad to say many people do.

By: Aisha Stacey

It has been estimated that up to 95% of all human behaviors are learnt through looking up to role models. However, even if it were only partially true it is a very good reason to choose positive role models, for ourselves and our children. Sadly, in today’s 24/7 media saturated environment we are more likely to choose role models from the field of sports and entertainment without trying to differentiate between a role model and a hero. A hero is someone you admire perhaps for his sporting prowess or for her superb acting ability but do they lead the kind of lives that we should want to emulate? Role models, on the other hand, are people who possess the qualities that we would like to have and people who have affected us in a way that makes us want to be better human beings. For instance it is from role models that we learn how to handle life’s problems.

It is easy to be influenced by the people around us and whom we look up to. It is easy to take on their mannerisms and qualities without being aware of it. If these are good qualities then it is a good thing, but what if the people you consider as your role models have pushed you away from the remembrance of Allah? This could be a disaster. Fortunately Islamic history is peppered with amazing role models – men, women and children – from whom we learn how to be great mothers, fathers, teachers, friends, students, etc. Positive displays of good morals and manners, determination, will power, and high ethical standards help others emulate these positive attributes.

According to Islam, the best human beings are the prophets. After that, the best human beings are companions, disciples, and followers of the prophets. Of course the greatest example of exemplary behaviour in any given situation is Prophet Muhammad himself. We know from his authentic traditions – the Sunnah, that his character was the Quran, meaning that he lived and breathed all that the Quran teaches. When we are looking for role models we need look no further than the Prophet himself and those who surrounded him in the early days of Islam. In fact, when following the sahabah we are following Prophet Muhammad because they did not learn Islam from anyone other than him. Indeed their virtues are many; for they are the ones who supported Islam and spread the faith, fought along with the Prophet, and transmitted the Quran, Sunnah and the Islamic rulings. They sacrificed themselves and their wealth for the sake of Allah. We love them for they loved Allah and His Messenger.

Prophet Muhammad said, “The best of people is my generation, then those who come after them, then those who come after them.”[2] The sahabah did not all have the exact same personalities, backgrounds, mindsets, outlooks, or tastes. They were all unique; however they were united upon Islam. As Muslims, we too are not all the same. We are able to take distinct lessons from each of the sahabah; we are able to learn from their experiences. Some were gentle, others were strict; some were learned men and women, while others were unlettered. Some of the sahabah were ascetic while others were the millionaires and leading entrepreneurs of their time. It is from the mercy of Allah that He has given us so many role models for behaviour, character, and conduct. Let us continue our exploration by looking at two of Prophet Muhammad’s closest friends.

Abu Bakr

Abu Bakr was a successful merchant with a reputation for honesty and kindness. He was the first adult man to convert to Islam, and accepted Prophet Muhammad’s message instantly. Prophet Muhammad said that if he were to weigh the Imaan of Abu bakr it would outweigh that of the entire Ummah. Abu Bakr excelled in every form of worship and was known as “As-Sabbaaq” – meaning the one who wins in every competition. Umar Ibn Al-Khattab once donated half of his wealth to fund the Battle of Tabuk, hoping to outdo Abu Bakr, only to find out that Abu Bakr had already donated his entire fortune. Abu Bakr was tender-hearted and compassionate. He sympathized with the poor and pitied the miserable and when reciting Quran, he would weep.

Umar Ibn Al-Khattab

Umar Ibn Al-Khattab went from being one of the strongest opponents of Islam to one of its staunchest believers. Umar was a pioneering figure in the Islamic world. He was a leader, a statesman, a pious and God-conscious Muslim who showed respect for all individuals including non-Muslims and he ordered the Muslims to treat non-Muslims with respect. He showed us how to apply the Quranic injunction ‘there is no compulsion in religion’. Umar was known for his power, and strength and he used this, his bold intellect, and his far-sighted wisdom for the sake of Islam and for the empowerment of Muslims. Prophet Muhammad called Umar “Al- Farooq” – the Criterion between good and evil.

Because human beings learn so much through imitating the behaviour of others it is important that they choose or are given access to good role models. In a world that more often than not derides Islamic morals and manners it is essential that Muslims have people to look up to, admire and emulate. There are no better people than members of the sahabah, those men, women and children that were close to Prophet Muhammad and were taught Islam as it was revealed. Above we looked briefly at two male sahabi and now we will look at two of Prophet Muhammad’s most influential wives.

Khadijah, the daughter of Khuwaylid

Khadijah was the first, and for 25 years, the only wife of Prophet Muhammad. She was 40 years old and twice widowed when she married Muhammed, then aged 25, who had not at that stage been granted prophethood. Khadijah was an accomplished businesswoman, wealthy in her own right with a reputation of dealing with the disabled, orphans, widows and the poor with kindness and compassion; she was known as “At-Tahira”, the pure one. Khadijah loved and supported Prophet Muhammad through the first difficult years of Islam. She did so in the spirit of partnership and companionship that is inherent in a truly Islamic marriage.

Khadijah was the first person to accept the message of Islam and she stood by her husband as family and friends turned against him, and plotted to kill him. Khadijah supported the rise of Islam with her wealth and health. She provided food, water and medicines for the banished and boycotted community. Even though she was not accustomed to deprivation, Khadijah never complained about the poor conditions she was forced to endure. After Khadijah passed away (three years before the migration of Muslims from Makkah to Madina), Prophet Muhammad remarked that she had been a loving mother, a loyal and sympathetic wife who shared all his deepest secrets and dreams.

Aisha the daughter of Abu Bakr

Aisha was the daughter of Abu Bakr, one of the Prophet Muhammad’s closest companions. During her marriage to the Prophet Muhammad, the couple developed a close relationship and it was in Aisha’s arms that the Prophet Muhammad died in 632 CE. Regarded by many as his favourite wife, she was an active figure in numerous events and an important witness to many more.

Aisha was generous and patient. She bore without complain the poverty and hunger that was common in the early days of Islam. For days on end no fire would be lit in the sparsely furnished house of the Prophet for cooking or baking bread and they would live merely on dates and water. The poverty did not distress or humiliate Aisha and the self-sufficiency when it did arrive did not corrupt her gentle ways.

Aisha was also well known for her wisdom and curiosity. She would always ask questions and clarify even the smallest points; this made her a priceless resource. More than 2,000 hadith narrations can be traced back to her. Due to her vast knowledge, she was often consulted before rulings were made or decisions taken. She lived long after the death of the Prophet and was she was able to teach the Muslims their religion for many years before her death.

As we discussed in lesson 1, people, particularly children learn by copying the behaviour of the important or famous people in their lives. Try to remember the last time you listened to children playing; many of them desire to be the latest sports star or music sensation. Sadly in some cases by the time they reach adulthood these children can tell you everything about media stars but not a single fact about the companions of Prophet Muhammad. They can quote sporting statistics perfectly but stumble through the recitation of Al-Fatihah. On the Day of Resurrection, these entertainment idols will ignore and disown all those who took them as role models. Interestingly, at the conclusion of a Reebok ad the basketball idol walks to the camera and says, “Just because I dunk a ball doesn’t mean I have to raise your kids.” Even the stars themselves realise that they do not always display behaviour that others should aspire to or emulate.

Role models not only demonstrate the best behaviour, they also demonstrate how to learn from mistakes and failures. The sahabah in particular often found themselves in difficult situations and on steep learning curves. In many cases it was Prophet Muhammad himself who corrected their behaviour, and he did it in a way that did not humiliate or upset the offender. Good roles, such as the sahabah teach by their behaviour; they teach those who look up to them to live in a way that is pleasing to Allah. From them we learn that human beings are not perfect but they can seek to please Allah in everything they do and in every reaction to outside influences. 

Being a Father: A Blessing that Boosts Productivity

Father and son playing and bonding on Bogey-Board on Morro Stran

As Muslims, we often hear about the virtues, blessings and rewards of motherhood in Islam. And while it seems Muslim men can never quite reach such lofty heights, fatherhood still comes with a plethora of goodness. In this article, we will briefly examine a few areas that can help Muslim fathers appreciate the immense blessings and opportunities for personal growth that come with fatherhood.

For all the new fathers, the fathers-to-be and those who have been on the job for a long time and need some motivation, here are a few of the many tremendous blessings and opportunities for increased productivity that Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) has granted you through your role of being a father:

1. A Personal Sign and Trust

To start, the simple act of observation can bring one closer to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He). Intellectually, we know that Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) is the Creator, Cherisher, Nourisher and Sustainer of everything. But this knowledge is brought to life in a very personal way when you see your child grow from a little ‘bean’ in the womb, to a foetus, then an infant, a toddler and beyond — thereby increasing you in submission to Him subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He).

Beyond observation, the fact that Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) has given you a child means He subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) trusts you and deems you worthy enough to raise another human being. By accepting this responsibility and proceeding with the right intentions, every moment spent in fulfilling this trust can become an act of worship.

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Drinking too much water: risk of death

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When we talk about drinking too much people always are thinking of alcohol. But man can drink too much water. He can therefore reach a water poisoning and may die of it. But when you drink too much water? And when there arises a water poisoning by drinking too much water? Read about water intoxication and the reaction of the body to drinking too much water.

Per day, 1.5 liters of water a day is healthy
Who wants to fall off, who wants healthy skin, whose bodies would provide moisture, good to drink a day. If we believe the blades 1.5 to 2 liters of water What is forgotten is that normal eating too much moisture is present and that the many cups of tea, coffee or soft drinks also contain water. Moreover, a body may also fall within given too much water, and that then results in a water intoxication.

The qualities of water

  • You get a nicer skin
  • It helps in weight loss
  • You flush it with wastes from the body
  • It is good for bowel movements
  • It’s good for your heart

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