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Color And Its Effects On Your Mood

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By: Jade Small

Source: http://www.the-open-mind.com/color-and-its-effects-on-your-mood/

THE EFFECTS OF COLOUR IN OUR DAILY LIVES

RED

The color red grabs your attention, and increases your blood pressure, pulse and breathing, according to the Paint Quality Institute’s website. Red is the color most often associated with passion and love. Red also can stimulate your appetite, which makes it a good color choice for your dining room. Red clothing can be energizing, and will earn you second looks. Mix red with white, and it transforms into a romantic and relaxing color–pink.

ORANGE

Orange conveys excitement and energy. In ancient cultures, orange was used to heal the lungs and increase energy levels. While orange is attention-grabbing, it also is bright, friendly and reminiscent of beautiful fall colors. Use orange–and its more muted cousin, rust–to create a welcoming room.

YELLOW

Yellow represents sunshine, cheer, optimism and clarity. Yellow enhances concentration, according to InfoPlease.com. Although it usually is considered a cheerful color, yellow can have negative effects. Of all the colors, yellow is hardest on the eyes, and it may stimulate your frustration and anger.

BLUE

Blue, the color of sky and water, represents calmness and serenity. Fashion consultants often recommend wearing blue for a job interview, since it conveys loyalty, reliability and productivity, says David Johnson in the article “Color Psychology” published by InfoPlease.com. You may wish to use this color in your bedroom for its soothing effects. An overabundance of blue, however, can feel cold and depressing.

GREEN

Green, the color of nature, is refreshing and relaxing. Hospitals and doctors’ offices often use green because it’s considered a healing color. Schools and businesses frequently employ this color in their decor for its stress-relieving effects. Green is an easy color to live with in any room of your home.

PURPLE

In its deepest shades, purple conveys richness, majesty and drama. Its connection to royalty dates to ancient times when purple dye was so expensive only by the wealthy could afford it, according to the Institute for Interactive Technology. Choose lighter shades of purple for a creative, feminine and sophisticated room.

BLACK AND WHITE

While black and white may be considered neutral, each has powerful associations of its own. Black can represent power and elegance. You may love wearing black for its sophisticated, slimming effect. In decorating, black can give a room depth. White connotes cleanliness and purity, and, as a wall color, it provides a clean background for other colors.

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Subhana’llah: Lavender Fields (IMAGES)

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info-pictogram1 Nectar from lavender plants are used to make high quality honey. Lavender comes from the same family as mint. The scent of lavender deters mice, flies, mosquitoes and other pests from the area. It is one of the most fragrant and highly versatile herbs that you can grow. As you may already know, lavender is used in essential oils, perfumes, in aromatherapy, in traditional herbal medicine and in the kitchen as a culinary herb.

Subhana’llah: Dahlia Flower (IMAGES)

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info-pictogram1 Dahlia flower season begins in early spring and continues though summer into early fall.

Heard of Blue Flames? Here’s Blue Lava (IMAGES)

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info-pictogram1 Photographer Olivier Grunewald lost two lenses and a camera in pursuit of these otherworldly images of an Indonesian sulfur mine called Kawah Ijen, but that hardship is nothing compared to the job of the miners, who hike to the top of the peak, descend 660 feet into its crater, then pick up chunks of raw sulfur and slog them back up to the rim in a pair of baskets that hold 100 to 200 pounds.

Sulfur becomes molten at temps just over the boiling point of water and turns into the spectral blue lava you see here. Conditions in the crater aren’t actually hot enough for the sulfur to self-combust — it turns molten when miners drop their torches.

If you’ve ever been around a hot spring, you can only imagine the smell. Grunewald wore a gas mask for his shots (and threw away his clothes afterward), while few of the miners had any such protection. And should you ever find yourself there, careful where you step — that lake is sulfuric acid.

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144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan

Source: http://www.boredpanda.com/largest-wisteria-bloom-japan/

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Image credits: y-fu

info-pictogram1 This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.

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Image credits: Takao Tsushima

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Image credits: Taka Ochiai

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Image credits: takeoh

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Image credits: y-fu

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Image credits: P-Zilla

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Image credits: P-Zilla

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Image credits: Makoto Yoneda

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Image credits: Mamiko Irie

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Image credits: tungnam.com.hk

Color Symbolism and Culture

Color Symbolism Chart

Red: Excitement, energy, passion, love, desire, speed, strength, power, heat, aggression, danger, fire, blood, war, violence, all things intense and passionate, sincerity, happiness (Only in Japan)
Pink symbolizes love and romance, caring, tenderness, acceptance and calm.
Beige and ivory symbolize unification. Ivory symbolizes quiet and pleasantness. Beige symbolizes calm and simplicity.
Yellow signifies joy, happiness, betrayal, optimism, idealism, imagination, hope, sunshine, summer, gold, philosophy, dishonesty, cowardice, jealousy, covetousness, deceit, illness, hazard and friendship.
Blue: Peace, tranquility, cold, calm, stability, harmony, unity, trust, truth, confidence, conservatism, security, cleanliness, order, loyalty, sky, water, technology, depression, appetite suppressant.
Turquoise symbolizes calm. Teal symbolizes sophistication. Aquamarine symbolizes water. Lighter turquoise has a feminine appeal.
Purple: Royalty, nobility, spirituality, ceremony, mysterious, transformation, wisdom, enlightenment, cruelty, honor, arrogance, mourning, temperance.
Lavender symbolizes femininity, grace and elegance.
Orange: Energy, balance, enthusiasm, warmth, vibrant, expansive, flamboyant, demanding of attention.
Green: Nature, environment, healthy, good luck, renewal, youth, spring, generosity, fertility, jealousy, inexperience, envy, misfortune, vigor.
Brown: Earth, stability, hearth, home, outdoors, reliability, comfort, endurance, simplicity, and comfort.
Gray: Security, reliability, intelligence, staid, modesty, dignity, maturity, solid, conservative, practical, old age, sadness, boring. Silver symbolizes calm.
White: Reverence, purity, birth, simplicity, cleanliness, peace, humility, precision, innocence, youth, winter, snow, good, sterility, marriage (Western cultures), death (Eastern cultures), cold, clinical.
Black: Power, sexuality, sophistication, formality, elegance, wealth, mystery, fear, evil, unhappiness, depth, style, sadness, remorse, anger, anonymity, underground, good technical color, mourning, death (Western cultures), austerity, detachment.

TULIP FIELDS, NETHERLANDS

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Tulips have long been one of the hallmarks of the Netherlands, and one of the main exports of the country. Every March, the fields just outside the Dutch capital Amsterdam turn from sandy patches into carpets of lime green sprouts. By the time the season is in full swing, the area is swathed in red, pink, purple, orange, and yellow blooms. The view really that reminds of The Wizard of Oz.