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RAINBOW AND LIGHTNING OVER MANILLA, PHILIPPINES (IMAGE)

BY-eJwiCAAAUA-G

When you see a rainbow…it is after rain. The sun is always behind you and the rain in front of you when a rainbow appears, so the center of the rainbow’s arc is directly opposite the sun.

Most people think…the only colors of a rainbow are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet, but a rainbow is actually made up of an entire continuum of colors—even colors the eye can’t see!

We are able to see the colors of a rainbow because…light of different colors is refracted when it travels from one medium, such as air, and into another- -in this case, the water of the raindrops. When all the colors that make up sunlight are combined, they look white, but once they are refracted, the colors break up into the ones we see in a rainbow.

Every person…sees their own “personal” rainbow. When you look at one, you are seeing the light bounced off of certain raindrops, but when the person standing next to you looks at the same rainbow, they may see the light reflecting off other raindrops from a completely different angle. In addition, everyone sees colors differently according to light and how their eyes interpret it.

You can never…actually reach the end of a rainbow, where a pot of gold supposedly awaits. As you move, the rainbow that your eyes see moves as well, because the raindrops are at different spots in the atmosphere. The rainbow, then, will always “move away” at the same rate that you are moving.

15 FOODS THAT WILL IMPROVE YOUR MEMORY

Whole Grains

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The ability to concentrate and focus comes from an adequate and steady supply of energy. The brain cannot work without energy which comes in the form of glucose in our blood to the brain. Whole grains release glucose slowly into the bloodstream, keeping you mentally alert throughout the day.

Tomatoes

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Tomatoes contain lycopene, a powerful antioxidant. It has been found to help protect the organism from the radical damage to cells which occurs in the development of dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s.

Oily Fish

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Oily fish is the source of omega-3 fats. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) cannot be made by the body, and therefore these fats should be obtained through diet. Oily fish contains EFA in a ready-made form, which enables the body to use it easily. Examples of oily fish include salmon, trout, mackerel, herring, sardines, pilchards, and kippers. The consumption of these fish can decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and memory loss.

Blueberries

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Several researches have shown that consumption of blueberries may be effective in improving your memory and delaying short-term memory loss. Moreover, blueberries are a source of valuable vitamins. The fact they are widely avaliable makes it even easier to include them in your diet.

Artichokes

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Artichokes are low in calories, high in fibre, and contain luteolin. Research has shown that luteolin is responsible for improving spatial working memory. Artichokes are very rich in antioxidants, making them a very good option for those who are on a diet and want to improve the overall brain performance.

Green Tea

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Research has shown that green tea naturally contains high levels of the chemical EGCG (epigallocatechin-3 gallate), which is a potent antioxidant. EGCG improves cognitive functions and memory. Around three cups of organic green tea everyday is an excellent way to give your memory a boost.

Eggs

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Eggs are one of the best sources choline.Choline is an essential nutrient that is used to produce acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter involved in memory. Choline is found in the myelin sheath that insulates nerve fibers throughout the brain.

Coconut Oil

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Coconut oil is abundant in medium-chain fatty acids, which make it the perfect brain fuel. Coconut oil does not turn into harmful trans-fats at high temperatures, which also makes it a healthy oil to use in your cooking. 20 milliliters of good-quality, cold-pressed organic coconut oil a day is certainly a healthy option for your mental health.

Nuts

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Nuts are a great source of vitamin E. Research shows that a good intake of vitamin E might help prevent cognitive decline, particularly in the elderly. Moreover, consuming nuts on regular basis also provides the organism with several essential natural oils.

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CUMULONIMBUS CLOUDS

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Cumulonimbus clouds rise vertically until they hit a natural barrier. After they encounter the barrier which we call tropopause, the clouds flatten out. This type of clouds usually heralds the onset of a severe storm. Cumulonimbus clouds can cast a large shadow on the land below.

LIGHT PILLARS

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The light pillars typically form in the sky in very cold weather, when ice crystals are suspended in the atmosphere. They form around natural light sources, like the setting sun or moon. The higher the ice crystals, the taller the light pillar will appear.

AURORA BOREALIS IN THE NORTH

Scientists and Auroras

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Scientists have spent many hours studying these lights, trying to understand how it came to be. One of the early theories was that the Northern lights are a reflection of the light from the ice caps. The first scientist who started seriously studying this phenomenon was Galileo Galilei who came up with the name aurora borealis borrowing names from Aurora, the Roman goddess of the dawn, and Boreas, Greek name for the northern wind.

Auroras on Other Planets

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Because there are magnetic fields on other planets in the Solar System and deep atmosphere on Jupiter and Saturn, the gas giants, they have spectacular auroras. Mars also has auroras, although much weaker than on Earth.

Where to Go to See It?

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The best places to view auroras are high northern latitudes during the winter, Alaska, Canada, and Scandinavia. During very large solar activity events, the aurora may be seen throughout the US and Europe, but these events are rare. The furthest it has been recorded was in Mexico City back in 1958.

Natural Attraction

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Various debris, radiation, and other magnetic waves from space attack Earth daily. Without a shield, there would be no life on the Earth. Our planet’s magnetic field does a good job of protecting us and deflecting the deadly rays, including the ones from the Sun. When the particles approach the globe, they are drawn to the poles.

 

What Are the Northern Lights?

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Solar wind or particles from the Sun rush towards the Earth at a tremendous speed of 90 miles per second on a journey of 93 million miles through space to tackle the Earth. When they enter the Earth’s atmosphere, they are mixed with oxygen and nitrogen gases and create light.

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