Blog Archives

The Life and Legacy of Malcolm X: with Dr. Umar Faruq Abd-Allah and Imam Zaid Shakir (Video)

Ta’leef Collective presents, in its entirety, a lecture given by Dr. Umar Faruq Abd-Allah and Imam Zaid Shakir on the life and legacy of our beloved leader and teacher Malcolm X (El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz).

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Documentary: Dr. Umar Johnson about Malcolm X (Video)

Malcom X in 23 Quotes

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Source: ciibroadcasting.com

February 21 2015 marked 50 years since the assassination of outspoken African-American Muslim stalwart Malik al Shabazz. Malcolm X, as he was also known, was gunned down at the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem in 1965 while preparing to give a speech.

As an NPR blog notes, Al Shabazz can be considered as one of the great public speakers of all-time.

And while Malcolm X may have had a natural leaning toward dramatic interpretation, for him public speaking was a learned skill. At the age of 21, he was a middle school dropout and prison inmate who, “didn’t know a verb from a house.” Three months shy of his 40th birthday, he was an international media presence, a voracious reader, tough debater and a leading proponent of black nationalism.”

Below we reproduce some of al Shabazz’s iconic words, many of which may still ring a poignant bell today.

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Imam Siraj Wahhaj: Mark of a Hero – Malcolm X (Video)

info-pictogram1 Main Session 4, Mark of a Hero: They were the epitome of bravery and their lives are soaked with heroic qualities that the entire world marvels at hundreds of years later. This session will unravel the characteristics & persona of the greatest heroes of the past and practical steps towards inculcating similar qualities in our own lives. Sh. Waleed Basyouni will speak on the respected early scholar of Islam, Hassan al-Basri.
More Imam Siraj Wahhaj lectures…

Malcolm X – Advice to Muslim women

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6 Great Converts To Islam

Barmakid Family (600s-900s)

The Barmakids were a family of Buddhist administrators from the city of Balkh, in what is now Afghanistan. When the Umayyad Caliphate conquered the area in the the mid-600s, the family converted to Islam. After the Abbasid Revolution in 750, the Barmakids rose to prominence as talented administrators. They carried with them centuries of experience in the Persian Empire of how to manage large government bureaucracies, something the Arab Abbasid caliphs were ignorant of.

As viziers, they exercised great influence on the formation of the empire in the late 8th century. Yahya ibn Khalid al-Barmaki was particularly influential. He was appointed as the tutor and mentor to the young Harun al-Rashid, who would go on to become the caliph during which the Abbasids had their golden age. Under his tutelage, Harun al-Rashid managed to establish peace with the empire’s neighbors, exponential economic growth, the patronage of scholars, and a system of infrastructure that rivaled that of ancient Rome. The Barmakid family as a whole thus had a huge impact on the political shape of the Muslim world that would continue for centuries.

Berke Khan (Unknown-1266)

As the grandson of the great Mongol conqueror, Genghis Khan, Berke Khan was an important figure in the Mongol world in the mid-1200s. Like other Mongols, he originally practiced a form of pagan shamanism. As the leader in the Golden Horde – a Mongol army –  he was sent to the North Caucasus Mountains and Eastern Europe to subdue the Kipchak Turks. He eventually managed to lead armies all the way into Hungary.

Hulagu Khan's army attacking Baghdad

Hulagu Khan’s army attacking Baghdad

Then during his travels back towards the Mongol homeland, he stopped in Bukhara where he questioned local Muslims about their beliefs. He was convinced of the message of Islam and converted, becoming the first Mongol leader to accept Islam. After his conversion, many of the soldiers in his army also converted, leading to tension with the other Mongol armies, who were ravaging Muslim lands, including the ancient capital of the Abbasids, Baghdad.

After hearing of the sack of Baghdad in 1258 by his cousin, Hulagu Khan, Berke promised vengance, declaring, ”He (Hulagu) has sacked all the cities of the Muslims, and has brought about the death of the Caliph. With the help of God I will call him to account for so much innocent blood.” By allying with the Mamluk Sultanate of Egypt, Berke managed to hold back Hulagu’s army enough to prevent a major invasion (and destruction) of the remainder of Muslim lands in Egypt, Syria, and the Hijaz.

Zağanos Pasha (Unknown-1461)

Of Greek or Albanian origin, Zağanos Pasha was drafted into the elite Janissary corps of the Ottoman Empire as a child. Like other Janissaries, he was educated in Islam, civil administration, and military matters. He was soon appointed as a mentor and advisor for a young Mehmed II, who would later become the seventh sultan in the Ottoman dynasty.

When Mehmed became sultan, he appointed Zağanos Pasha as his second vizier. Zağanos Pasha was commonly consulted on all matters of state, especially the siege and conquest of Constantinople in 1453. During the siege, he was given command of a section of the army north of the city, and his troops were among the first to successfully capture a portion of Constantinople’s legendary walls. His legacy lives today in the numerous endowments (including mosques, soup kitchens, and public baths) in his hometown of Balikesir as well as in Edirne.

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