Blog Archives

The earth is not our final destination

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Once a man visited Abu Dharr (radi Allahu anhu) and began looking at the contents of his house but found it quite bare. He asked Abu Dharr (radi Allahu anhu), “Where are your possessions?” Abu Dharr (radi Allahu anhu) replied, “We have a house yonder (meaning the Hereafter) to which we send the best of our possessions.” The man understood what he meant and said, “But you must have some possessions so long as you are in this abode.” “The owner of this abode will not leave us in it” replied Abu Dharr (radi Allahu anhu).

The earth is not our final destination. We are to use it to make preparations for the next life. Concerning the life of this world Eesa (Jesus) (alaihis salaam) said, “This world is like a bridge, cross it and do not build on it.” This life is a bridge from our previous existence as soul to our next existence in the Hereafter. Houses are built on land. The most appropriate place to build, the focus of our attention, should be the land that we will set foot on once we cross the bridge that is our earthly existence. People like Abu Dharr (radi Allahu anhu) set the example for us.

From Muhammad to ISIS: Iraq’s Full Story

Source: waitbutwhy.com

By: Tim Urban

On the morning of Saturday, August 2nd, I got in a taxi in Erbil, the regional capital of Kurdish Iraq, and asked the driver to take me to the Khazir refugee camp.

This was a scary-ish thing to do.

The “scary” part is a result of the fact that the Khazir camp is outside of the borders of the somewhat autonomous Kurdish region, one of the only secure parts of the country.

The “ish” part comes from the fact that the Khazir camp, though outside of Kurdish borders, is still in an area currently controlled by the Peshmerga—the Kurdish army.

Iraq has been a scary place for a while now, for a number of reasons, but it’s currently scary in italics because of the terrorist group we’ve all gotten to know about in the past three months—ISIS.

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The scramble for Africa

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Whether in bustling cities or remote villages, the 1880s and 1890s were years of terrifying upheaval for Africans. Fleet upon fleet of foreign soldiers armed with new weaponry – and a sense of entitlement – descended, seemingly overnight.

In the space of just 20 years, 90 per cent of Africa was brought under European occupation. Europe had captured a continent.

Europe was in the throes of the Industrial Revolution. The advent of the machine was transforming the cities there into the workshop of the world – a workshop in need of raw materials. It was the dawn of industrial-scale production, modern capitalist economies and mass international trade. And in this new industrial era the value of Africa rocketed – not only for its materials and as a strategic trade route, but also as a market for the goods Europe now produced in bulk.

But the scramble for Africa was not just about economics. Colonialism had become the fast-track to political supremacy in Europe. Rival European powers convened in the German capital and in February 1885 signed the Act of Berlin – an agreement to abolish slavery and allow free trade. The act also drew new borders on the map of Africa, awarding territory to each European power – thus legalising the scramble for Africa.

But with the Second World War – which saw the peak of Europe’s dependency on African troops – a powerful genie was released from a bottle – African nationalism. The tipping point came on February 3, 1960, when Harold Macmillan, the British prime minister, gave his ‘wind of change’ speech. Within 10 months, Britain had surrendered two key African territories and France 14. The rate of decolonisation when it arrived was breathtaking.

Seventeen African nations gained their independence in 1960, but the dreams of the independence era were short-lived. Africa … states of independence tells the story of some of those countries – stories of mass exploitation, of the ecstasy of independence and of how – with liberation – a new, covert scramble for resources was born.

What’s The Difference Between Great Britain And The UK? (Video)

info-pictogram1 If you’re confused about the difference between the United Kingdom and Great Britain, don’t worry. In less than a minute, you’ll have it figured out.

Subhana’llah: Clear water in Indonesia (IMAGES)

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info-pictogram1 Indonesia shares land borders with Malaysia, Papua New Guinea and East Timor.

Malcolm X’s letter to his assistants in Harlem during his pilgrimage to Makkah in April of 1964

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Source: onislam.net

“Never have I witnessed such sincere hospitality and overwhelming spirit of true brotherhood as is practiced by people of all colors and races here in this ancient holy land, the home of ‪#‎Abraham‬, ‪#‎Muhammad‬ and all the other Prophets of the holy scriptures. For the past week, I have been utterly speechless and spellbound by the graciousness I see displayed all around me by people of all colors.

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Heavy rain pours across drought-hit Australia

Queensland and New South Wales receive much-needed wet weather.

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Source: http://www.aljazeera.com

Torrential rain has fallen across eastern Australia, precisely where the country needs it most.

Over 75% of Queensland is currently in the grip of a drought, which means the state is once again on the verge of seeing its most extensive drought on record.

The rain started on Friday, with some parts of Queensland seeing their first drops of rain in more than 6 months.

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Landscapes: Volume 3 (Video)

An Old Palestine Coin, Proof That This Is Their Land (IMAGES)

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For anyone who wants a simple proof that Palestine existed before 1948, here’s a coin from 1927 worth 10 Mils (this currency is no longer used). Also note that the word “Palestine” is written in both Arabic and Hebrew indicating not only a Jewish presence, but a prominent one. Jews and Arabs DID live side by side in peace. The Zionist idea that they cannot coexist is an absolute fallacy.” – Mahmod King