Blog Archives

Subhana’llah: Fireflies (IMAGES)

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info-pictogram1 Fireflies emit light mostly to attract mates, although they also communicate for other reasons as well, such as to defend territory and warn predators away. In some firefly species, only one sex lights up. In most, however, both sexes glow; often the male will fly, while females will wait in trees, shrubs and grasses to spot an attractive male. If she finds one, she’ll signal it with a flash of her own.

– Fireflies eat other fireflies.
– Fireflies have short lifespans (1 year).
– Fireflies are found on almost every continent.
– Fireflies are medically and scientifically useful.

RELATED: GLOWING FIREFLIES (Video)

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Subhana’llah: Toucan Bird (IMAGES)

Bird Toucan

info-pictogram1 Although they spend a lot of time in trees, they are not very good at flying. Toucans mainly travel among trees by hopping. When they do take flight, they flap their wings vigorously and glide, traveling only short distances.

Source: http://www.animalfactguide.com/

Documentary: Broken Dreams – The Boeing 787 (Video)

info-pictogram1 Al Jazeera’s Investigative Unit and reporter Will Jordan investigate Boeing’s “Dreamliner”, finding some workers with quality concerns, alleging drug use and fearing to fly the plane they build.
More documentaries…

What are chemtrails?

Source: http://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/flight/modern/what-are-chemtrails.htm

By: Jane McGrath

The trail of clouds that billow from anairplane streaking across the sky can be mesmerizing for children and adults alike. Jet engine traffic has become so common that it’s not unusual to see several lingering streaks in the afternoon. And though many consider the streaks beautiful against a bright blue sky, others are alarmed about them. Concerns range from the idea that these streaks could exacerbate global warming to more elaborate theories that the government has secretly been dumping harmful substances on the land.

Before we get into the various theories about the possible harmful effects, let’s discuss the scientific explanation for these streaks. Jet engines spew out very hot air. And, because water vapor is one of the byproducts of the exhaust, the air is also very humid. However, high in the atmosphere where these jets fly, the air is typically very cold — often lower than -40 degrees Fahrenheit. Additionally, the atmosphere up there is often of low vapor pressure, or the force exerted by a gas on the surrounding environment.

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When a jet engine is spewing out hot, humid air into an atmosphere that is cold and has low vapor pressure, the result is condensation. The water vapor coming out of the engine quickly condenses into water droplets and then crystallizes into ice. The ice crystals are the clouds that form behind the engine. This is why the streaks are called contrails, short for “condensation trails.” To help explain it, scientists liken it to seeing your breath on cold days. You may have noticed that puffs of breath dissipate quickly on dryer days. The same is true of contrails: When the atmosphere is more humid, the contrails linger, but when the atmosphere is dry, the contrails disappear more quickly.

This explanation makes sense. But, as author and airline pilot Patrick Smith tells readers, the contrails consist of not just ice crystals and water vapor but also other byproducts of engine exhaust. These include carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfate particles and soot

. Some point out that these, in addition to the extra cloud cover, can have negative environmental effects. And conspiracy theorists have nicknamed contrails “chemtrails” under the suspicion that the government is taking advantage of this scientific phenomenon to secretly release other substances into the atmosphere.

Subhana’llah: Amazonian Royal Flycatcher (IMAGES)

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info-pictogram1 The Amazonian Royal Flycatcher is found in forest and woodland throughout most of the Amazon basin in northern Bolivia, eastern Peru, eastern Ecuador, eastern Colombia, Venezuela, the Guianas, and northern and western Brazil. It is easily overlooked and typically found in low densities, but overall it remains widespread and common.

Subhana’llah: Secretarybird (IMAGES)

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info-pictogram1 A relative of the hawk, the secretary bird is the only bird of prey who does more walking than flying, up to 20 miles a day. With very large, broad wings, secretary birds are also strong fliers and use thermal air currents to rise and soar. When hunting, they stamp on the ground to flush out small animals, then run in a zigzag pattern, flapping their wings to confuse their prey.

Subhana’llah: Gouldian Finch (IMAGES)

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info-pictogram1 Gouldian finches are native only to northern Australia. These finches prefer tropical savanna near bodies of water. Though Gouldian finches are migratory, they do not migrate great distances.

Subhana’llah: Strawberry Bird (IMAGES)

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info-pictogram1 The red avadavat, red munia or strawberry finch (Amandava amandava) is a sparrow-sized bird of the Estrildidae family. It is found in the open fields and grasslands of tropical Asia and is popular as a cage bird due to the colourful plumage of the males in their breeding season. It breeds in the Indian Subcontinent in the monsoon season. The species name of amandava and the common name of avadavat are derived from the city of Ahmedabad in Gujarat, India, from where these birds were exported into the pet trade in former times.

Subhana’llah: Inca Dove (IMAGES)

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info-pictogram1 There are around 10000 different species of birds worldwide.