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2 HEADED SNAKE EATING – both heads trying to eat (Video)

Sheikh Bilal Philips: Harmful Nature of Pigs and Impermissible Foods (Video)

info-pictogram1 In this segment, Sheikh Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips confirms that the harms of the swine are so obvious and that it inclines to eat filth by nature so you cannot change its behavior. Afterwards he shows that Allah could not forbid us from the beneficial things but the harmful things.

My Halal Kitchen

Welcome to all things related to halal cooking, eating, and of course the halal kitchen itself. I hope you will join me in sharing and exchanging delicious halal recipes for all seasons and all meals you can prepare any day of the week. So, what’s all this halal talk about?

VISIT: http://myhalalkitchen.com/

Why Halal? Muslims who follow the Islamic dietary standard of eating will consume halal (means‘permissible’ in Arabic) foods and beverages. These are considered pure foods ordained for mankind by Allah (God) in the Holy Qur’an and Hadith (sayings of the Prophet Muhammed (peace be upon him). Commonly recognized items that are not halal are pork and all its by-products as well as any type of intoxicating drink, or even drugs. That said, an observer of Islam (i.e. a Muslim) doesn’t drink alcohol or eat pork or foods with their by-products or derivatives. For example, boxed jello and marshmallows usually contain gelatin, which is often derived from pork and therefore not halal (but it could be if halal ingredients are used). Additional non-halal things include birds of prey, carrion, carnivores, blood and human body parts (i.e. hair, which is becoming a common ingredient in processed foods like bread).

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SHOCKING MUST SEE! Humans EATING Themselves to DEATH (VIDEO)

#Obesity

Allah says, “…make not your own hands contribute to your destruction…” (Qur’an 2:195); “…nor kill yourselves…” (Qur’an 4:29).

Overweight and Obesity is One Of the worlds biggest “preventable killers”, with leading risks for global deaths. Over 30% of the world’s population is now either obese or overweight.

No country has been able to curb obesity rates even the Muslim world has been effected and has seen shocking increases, although Islam teaches some protective measures, the most important of which is moderation in eating and the prohibition on extravagance therein.

Allah, may He be exalted, says:

“and eat and drink but waste not by extravagance, certainly He (Allah) likes not Al-Musrifoon (those who waste by extravagance)”

[al-A ‘raaf 7:31].

The Messenger of Allah (PBHU) said:
“The son of Adam does not fill any vessel worse than his stomach. It is sufficient for the son of Adam to eat a few mouthfuls to keep him standing upright. But if he must (fill it), then one third for his food, one third for his drink, and one third for his breathing.”

Protection from harm of jinn…

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Source: missionislam.com

Because jinn can see us while we cannot see them, the Prophet (sall Allahu alayhi wasallam) taught us many ways to protect ourselves from their harm. By seeking refuge of Allah from the accursed shaytan, reciting surat al-Falaq and surah An-Naas, Ayat al Kursi and reciting the words taught by Allah in the Qur’an. Allah Almighty says, “And say: My Lord! I seek refuge in Thee from suggestions of the evil ones. And I seek refuge in Thee, my Lord, lest they be present with me.” (Al-Mu’minun: 97-98)

Saying Bismillah (in the Name of Allah) before entering one’s home, eating or drinking and having intercourse will keep shayateen from entering the house or partaking with a person in his food, drink and sexual activity. Similarly, mentioning the name of Allah before entering the toilet or taking off one’s clothes will prevent the jinn from seeing a person in a state of undress or harming him/her. The Prophet (sall Allahu alayhi wasallam) said: “To put a barrier that will prevent the jinn from seeing the `awrah (part of the body which must be covered) of the sons of Adam, let any one of you say ‘Bismillah’ when entering the toilet.” (Reported by At-Tirmidhi)

10 Tips for Maintaining Your Health After Ramadan

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By: Nadine Kamal

Source: http://productivemuslim.com/

Every year, the Holy month of Ramadan provides us with the opportunity to eliminate unhealthy eating patterns and gives our overburdened digestive systems a much needed break. During this sacred month, the rituals of fasting, night prayer and reading the Holy Qur’an on a daily basis can have a transformational effect on our overall sense of well-being and contentment.

However, now that the blessed month of Ramadan has passed and the Eid ul-Fitr festivities are over, here are 10 tips for maintaining the incredible health benefits and habits that you worked so hard to gain in Ramadan.

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Sunnahs for Eating (IMAGE)

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Three simple health tips for Ramadan

Edde-sands_-Ramadan

Source: http://www.khaleejtimes.com/

By: Mohamad Kadry

Fasting during the month of Ramadan can bring out many changes in those who observe it, but gluttony and laziness should not be among them.

These are problems that many people face each year when fasting from sunrise to sunset, tempted by copious amounts of food at Iftar combined with little to no physical activity throughout the day. But Ramadan should never be an excuse to overindulge.

While fasting, your body’s metabolism essentially slows down which can make you feel lethargic and help pack on unwanted weight. But with some careful planning there are a number of things you can implement into your daily schedule that will help you remain fit and strong throughout the month.

EAT RIGHT

Sharing a meal with friends and family is a vital component of the Holy Month, but that doesn’t mean you should be stuffing your face with unhealthy amounts of food. The temptation to overindulge is so great this month that most people dismiss it as unavoidable, but Ramadan can also be a great time to forge new eating habits. For Suhoor (pre-dawn meal), stick to wholesome foods that will provide enough energy to last during the long hours of fasting. These include a combination of fruits and vegetables that are rich in fibre, slow digesting foods like brown rice and wholemeal bread, and low-fat dairy products. In reality, most people are committing gluttony during Iftar (post-sunset) where fried food and sugary sweets dominate the menu. When your body has been deprived of food and drink all day, it only takes a few minutes of eating to start feeling sick in your stomach. Rather than filling up your plate at dinner time, try eating a few dates and a glass of water to help jump-start your system and replenish your energy levels. This can be followed by a bowl of lentil soup and a slice from all the major food groups including a piece of fruit, a serving of vegetable, brown rice or noodles and a protein like grilled fish or chicken. The most important thing to remember is that your body is in a somewhat fragile condition during this month, so feeding it the right types of nutrients is vital to keeping things running smoothly.

HIT THE GYM

Focusing on your spiritual needs during the Holy Month doesn’t mean neglecting the physical ones. If you already have a workout routine then the most important thing to do is maintain it. That usually means altering your normal workout schedule to a few hours after you break your fast. Make sure you have lean proteins, complex carbs and lots of vegetables. A brisk 45-minute session of low-intensity cardio and weight lifting will make a world of difference for your energy levels and waistline. If you don’t have the time for a gym session, then go for a long walk after Iftar. It’s vital that you do not stop being active, because you’ll regret it once Ramadan is over.

SLEEP WELL

Your sleep schedule risks falling into disarray during Ramadan for a variety of reasons that include staying up all night until Suhoor only to spend the rest of the morning and afternoon in bed. The Holy Month does not give you permission to waste away your days when you could otherwise be productive. While catching up with family and friends during the evening hours is a beautiful tradition for many people, you should end social gatherings at a decent hour and continue to get a full night’s rest. Messing with your body’s natural rhythm will have repercussions long after the month is over.

As Ramadan comes to an end: stay healthy

iftar-health

By: Zainab Mudallal

Sourcehttp://qz.com/

With only a few days left to go in the holy month of Ramadan, Muslims who observe the fast fall into two broad categories. Some are so used to the rhythms of fasting that it feels almost natural at this point. For others, the final stretch is psychologically and physically the hardest.

This year poses an even greater challenge, with Ramadan falling during some of the longest and hottest days of the year, requiring a fast of 15 or more hours in some parts of the world. The dramatic change from regular eating habits can take a toll on an one’s health and energy, and makes it difficult to keep up a regular fitness regimen. But there are ways to turn it around.

Here are some tips to make a Ramadan fast beneficial, rather than damaging, to your health:

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