Blog Archives

Chris Hedges on Roots of Terrorism, Free Speech Hypocrisy & Translating #JeSuisCharlie (Video)

info-pictogram1 On this episode of Breaking the Set, Abby Martin, discusses the lack of media coverage of the massacre of as many as 2,000 people in the town of Baga by Boko Haram militants. Abby then goes over the most outrageous responses to the Charlie Hebdo attack in Paris and why the clash of civilizations mentality when it comes to these type of acts is so misleading. Abby then speaks with Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and author, Chris Hedges, about the roots of the attacks in France and the relationship between global events and the rise of radicalization.

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The Sydney Siege: When journalism is hijacked (Video)

Sourcealjazeera.com

When news of the hostage taking in Sydney broke on December 15, 2014, reporters trying to cover the story were scrambling for scarce and valuable commodities: the facts.

Their coverage echoed what had happened in the Canadian capital, Ottawa, just a few weeks before. Both stories were about one armed man, acting alone – as opposed to as part of a wider conspiracy – and both stories were accompanied by news coverage that seemed disproportionate, both in editorial tone and in terms of volume. It was template journalism and the media were peddling the Islamic terror narrative.

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The Trews: Russell Brand – Is Ebola The New AIDS? (Video)

info-pictogram1 As flights are cancelled, communities stigmatised & mildly sick people fear for their lives, is it worth questioning what the biggest threat to our collective wellbeing is: rare tropical diseases, or the media coverage of them?

The Trews: Russell Brand – Why Do Fox News Love Guns So Much? (Video)

info-pictogram1 Russell Brand The Trews (E97). Analysis of Fox News coverage of gun control.

Talib Kweli: The Point That Went Missing concerns the debate with CNN

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By: Talib Kweli Greene

When I left for Ferguson, MO my intention was to only deal with the people in the community. My intention was not to participate in spectacle. But we all know what the road to hell is paved with. After receiving several phone calls from a producer at CNN, I decided to use my “fame” to shed light on the police aggression that the peaceful protestors and the community of Ferguson were facing.

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US media finally acknowledges Gazans’ plight

Israel may fear results as for first time, jolted by social media, mainstream channels reveal true conditions in Gaza.

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By: Patty Culhane

Source: http://blogs.aljazeera.com/

I sometimes wonder about how many businesses have been impacted by the invention of the Internet. Think about it, when we first started typing www, do you think any travel agents said well this is seriously going to kill my business? Did anyone envision the impact of what a store like Amazon would do to traditional business?

Who really thought well one day there will be a virtual store where I can buy costumes for my cat, laundry detergent and a blanket with sleeves. It’s changing something else that I truly never expected, the narrative of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the US.

For the first time, I’ve seen the mainstream media actually devote a considerable amount of time describing not just the current fighting but the conditions that the people of Gaza live under.

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Protesters force BBC to confront its pro-Israel bias

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By: Amena Saleem

Source: http://electronicintifada.net/blogs/amena-saleem/protesters-force-bbc-confront-its-pro-israel-bias

Approximately 5,000 protesters brought the roads around the BBC’s London headquarters to a standstill on 15 July, forcing the news organization to confront its one-sided coverage of Israel’s current assault on Gaza.

As the protesters shouted “BBC, shame on you,” Hugh Lanning, Chair of Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC), handed in a letter to the BBC’s Director General, Tony Hall. The letter calls on the BBC to reflect the reality of Gaza’s occupation and siege in its reporting. The open letter had been signed by 45,000 people in under a week. Signatories include scholar Noam Chomsky, filmmaker John Pilger, film director Ken Loach, musician Brian Eno, journalist Owen Jones and comedian and filmmaker Jeremy Hardy.

Protesters held up placards bearing statements from the letter, including: “We would like to remind the BBC that Gaza has no army, air force or navy” and “The BBC’s reporting of Israel’s assaults on Gaza is entirely devoid of context or background.” Speakers from organizations including Palestine Solidarity Campaign, the Palestinian Forum in Britain, Friends of Al Aqsa and Stop the War addressed the crowds.

As BBC employees watched from the top of their building, some recording the protest on mobile phones and tweeting out the footage, Lanning told the protestors: “There are lies, there are damned lies, and then there’s the BBC. Come on BBC, tell the truth — it’s the occupation, stupid.”

“Have we been biased at the BBC?”

Taking place on its doorstep, and with police having to guide out BBC staff who wanted to leave the building, it was a protest against its coverage that the BBC couldn’t ignore.

And the next day, the BBC’s flagship news program Today on Radio 4, ran a seven-minute segment asking, in the words of presenter Mishal Husain, “Are the protestors right? Have we been biased at the BBC in favor of Israel?”

It was an unprecedented segment — and maybe the first time the BBC has publicly held up a mirror to its reporting of the occupation.

Answering the question was Greg Philo, co-author of More Bad News from Israel, an in-depth study of the BBC and ITV’s (another British television network) coverage of Palestine, and professor of Communications and Social Change at Glasgow University.

Philo’s answers also broke new ground for the BBC. Uninterrupted, Philo was allowed to talk about subjects which normally appear to be taboo across the BBC’s output: Israel’s occupation, its siege of Gaza, the forced displacement of Palestinians in 1948, Israel’s “brutal apartheid” as he was allowed to describe it, and the illegality of Israel’s actions.

And, throughout, he emphasised the lack of the Palestinian viewpoint in BBC coverage in general.

Philo also praised those who had been at the demonstration, telling Husain: “I think actually the protesters are doing the BBC a favor. I think they will help the journalists to give a better perspective … I’ve had many senior journalists at the BBC saying they simply can’t get the Palestinian viewpoint across, that the perspective they can’t say is the Palestinian view that Israel is a brutal apartheid state.”

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