SIT UP STRAIGHT AT A COMPUTER

Become physically active in any sport that exercises the entire body. Pick a sport with aerobic, flexibility, and resistance type of training, especially ones with pre- and post-game stretching. A good way to tell that a specific sport is working for you is when you feel physically exhausted; pushing yourself just above or at your limit.
 
  • This will not only improve your fitness, but make you accustomed to learning new positions and make you ‘looser’ and more flexible. It will be easier to adjust how you sit when you can easily adjust into that pose.

When you sit at a computer desk it is important that you have proper posture.It is very disconcerting to make this type of statement to someone that does not understand or has never experienced proper posture: This natural posture feels good!

  • You will probably have to adjust the following things: Desk height, monitor height, and chair height. Getting the proper height of these three things just right takes trial and error.
Make sure your chair fits you. The most comfortable position is when your legs are in a perfect 90 degree angle and almost in a hovering position over the floor. The weight of your feet will feel light because the majority of weight is distributed through your upper legs or onto the chair.
 

Have a desk that is the proper height; your arms should be at a perfect 90 degree angle when typing. It feels like the majority of weight is distributed through your back instead of it feeling like you’re leaning your weight onto the desk through your hands or wrists. 

Make sure your monitors you are using for your computer are at the best height. Your eyes, when looking straight, should be pointed at the top half of the monitor 75-80% from bottom. They also need to be at the right distance. You can damage your eyes if you squint to see the computer. Stay at least two feet away: If you cannot see from that distance, adjust the screen resolution or see your optometrist.

  • When your body is accustomed to leaning forward or slouching when at your computer desk, it becomes even more difficult to correct your posture because you have become accustomed to that position (your muscles shorten in your chest, etc.). The aforementioned physical activity will help you with this.
  • The only thing that makes it difficult in correcting your posture is overcoming what you are accustomed to. By taking breaks regularly at set intervals and stretching periodically you may be able to overcome bad posture.

Degrees of Comfort

Little research has been done on the best way to sit upright. One American meta study in 1999 concluded that sitting at an angle of 110 to 130 degrees was optimal for spine comfort. A Scottish study published in 2007 found that leaning back at 135 degrees is ideal to prevent back strain. While interesting, this sort of precision may be impractical for most people, Dr. Golubic says.

Sitting to Death?

His clinic sees patients with multiple chronic illnesses. Nearly all of them sit for long periods each day. The term Sedentary Death Syndrome was coined by the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports in 2002 to address the growing consequences of a seated lifestyle. “There are studies on Sedentary Death Syndrome that show that sitting for hours can cause anything from lower back pain to high cholesterol, diabetes and obesity,” he says. In other words, no matter what position you’re sitting in all day, it is pretty bad for you.

The Perfect Pose

Body posture determines the efficiency of your breathing. “Relaxed, straight sitting”—with the core strong, shoulder blades active but not tight and spine erect—”expands your chest, allowing you to take in a larger breath…and you’ll have more energy and focus,” Dr. Golubic says. To achieve this, sit away from the back of your chair so you don’t slump, with your feet placed firmly on the ground. He sometimes sends patients home with a blue dot to put on their computer screens as a reminder to sit up straight and stretch and take a deep breath when they feel pain. There is also an app called PostureTrack that alerts users when they’re slumping.

Slump to a Hump

It’s not as though slouching will give you a hunchback in a day, but “if you do this day after day, and your muscles are not strong, the whole skeleton changes,” Dr. Golubic says. “I’m not aware of any studies that look at the changes in the volume of organs like the liver and spleen when you sit straight or slump forward. But we do know that when you slouch, you project an attitude of depression and low motivation.” When you sit up straight, he adds, “psychologically, your attitude is better.”

Core Message

If you’re not used to sitting up straight, you may feel lower back pain—an indicator that you need to strengthen your core and work on general fitness. Dr. Golubic almost always advises his patients to start yoga: “The first thing we learn in yoga is how to sit properly.”

Walk, Don’t Sit

The bottom line: How you sit is less important than how long you sit, Dr. Golubic says. He tries to get up from his desk often, doing “walking meetings” with colleagues and taking phone calls outdoors. “If you cannot walk,” he says, “At least stand.”

About Akhi Soufyan

If you see goodness from me, then that goodness is from The Creator. You should be thankful to The Creator for all of that. Cause I'm not the architect of that. I'm only the...the recipient. If you see weakness or shortcoming in me it's from my own weakness or shortcoming. And I ask The Creator and the people to forgive me for that. _______________________________ Website eigenaar voor een betere wereld en doel, niet gericht op verdiensten van geld maar goede daden. In de naam van Allah, de Barmhartige. Als je goedheid van mij ziet, dan is dat de goedheid van de Schepper (God). Wees De Schepper dankbaar voor dat. Want ik ben daar niet de architect van, ik ben alleen de ontvanger.

Posted on December 16, 2013, in ARTICLES and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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